Information about domestic and family violence


 

Informative posters

Warning Signs (PDF 178 kb)

Sexual Violence (PDF 178 kb)

Safe People vs Unsafe People (PDF 200 kb)

Coercive Control (PDF 182 kb)

Barriers to Leaving (PDF 217 kb)


 

The Duluth Model – Power and Control Wheel

“The Power and Control Wheel makes the pattern, intent, and impact of violence visible” (Domestic Abuse Intervention Project (DAIP), Duluth Model, 2017)

thumbnail image of the power and control wheel

Power and control wheel

Click to download the Power and Control Wheel (PDF 689kb)

The Equality Wheel

Equality wheel

Click to download the Equality Wheel (PDF 537kb)

The Power and Control Wheel is a helpful tool to understand the lived experience of women who live with men who use violence. It is characterised by the pattern of actions that an individual uses to intentionally control or dominate his intimate partner. That is why the words “power and control” are in the centre of the wheel.

A perpetrator of domestic violence systematically uses threats, intimidation, and coercion to instil fear in his partner. These behaviours are the spokes of the wheel. Physical and sexual violence holds it all together—this violence is the rim of the wheel.

A community using the Duluth Model approach:

  • Does not blame victim survivors but places accountability for abuse on perpetrators.
  • Has shared policies and procedures for holding perpetrators accountable and keeping victims safe across all agencies in the criminal and civil justice systems.
  • Prioritises the voices and experiences of women who experience abuse in the creation of those policies and procedures.
  • Believes that abuse is a pattern of actions used to control or dominate an intimate partner.
  • works to change conditions that support men’s use of power and control over women.
  • Offers change opportunities for persons using violence through education.
  • Advocates for improved community responses to domestic and family violence.

Power and Control Wheel and Equality Wheel provided by:

DOMESTIC ABUSE INTERVENTION PROGRAMS
202 East Superior Street Duluth, Minnesota 55802
218-722-2781 www.theduluthmodel.org

You can find explanatory videos and resources about the Duluth Model here

 

BACK TO TOP


 

Safety Planning

Safety planning is when you do things that make you and your family safer when you are experiencing domestic and family violence and abuse.

Sometimes safety plans might include trusted family members, friends, community members or support services. For some people it is not safe to include other people in their safety plans.

If you need support to make a safety plan for you or your children, our service can help you.

If you are safety planning for yourself think about the things that help you feel safer, and the things that make you feel less safe. Some people find it helpful to write down their safety plan, but this might not be safe for you.

Before writing down a safety plan think about whether it is safe to do so and if there is somewhere safe you can keep it where no one else will see it.

It is very important to trust yourself and your instincts when safety planning.

You and your children have the right to be safe.

For more information, visit Safety Planning and download the information sheets.

Please contact us if this is something you want help with.

BACK TO TOP


 

Worried about being bugged?

Are you worried someone will find out you visited this website?

Our website has a quick exit button near the bottom right-hand corner of the page. This button will close the DVAC website and open ABC News and the Google homepage. The button may be helpful if you are worried that you are being monitored and you are concerned that someone is about to see you looking at the DVAC site.

You may also want to delete your browser history. This means that the history of the websites you have visited will not be able to be seen. For information on deleting your internet history click here.

If someone is monitoring your online activity using spyware or monitoring devices, they may still be able to see that you have visited this website.

To discuss your online safety, speak with your DVAC support worker or call DVConnect 1800 811 811 (24-hour telephone advice line) or 1800 RESPECT (1800 737 732) (24-hour telephone counselling line).

For more information on your digital safety see:

BACK TO TOP


 

Children and young people

Children and Young People are impacted by domestic, family and sexual violence. Children have rights to be safe and you can find out more about your rights here.  For information about young people and safety please see this link.

DVAC have developed a video with young people and the community on consent and young people:


 

Women

Violence against women is a serious prevalent health issue in Australia and it is driven by gendered inequality.  Australia has clear evidence that gender inequality is a key driver of family, domestic, and sexual violence.

It is important that we are all acting towards gender equity in our workplaces, communities, and families. We can help prevent this by challenging the tolerating of violence against women.

Promoting women’s independence and decision making, challenging gender stereotypes, and strengthening equal and respectful relationships.

For more information see Our Watch Change the Story

BACK TO TOP


 

LGBTIQ community and domestic, family, or sexual violence

Domestic, family, or sexual violence can happen in any type of relationship or intimate partnership. It can happen to anyone. If you identify as LGBTIQ and are experiencing domestic, family, or sexual violence, please know that you are not alone. DVAC welcomes you.

Domestic, family, and sexual violence is never the fault of the person being abused or controlled. It is the responsibility of the person misusing power and control to stop their abusive behaviour.

LGBTIQ Handbook

The Queensland Government has released ‘Queer without Fear – Domestic and Family Violence in LGBTI Relationships’ LGBTIQ Handbook which you may find helpful.

LGBTIQ information in Auslan

https://youtu.be/IojSg-U6RkU (Source: Expression Australia)

BACK TO TOP


 

People with a disability

People with disabilities are welcome at DVAC. If you are in need of one of services we will do everything possible to accommodate your needs. Our buildings are wheelchair accessible.

We have voice to text interpreters available for phone contact, and are happy to work with you over phone, video, email, text or in person depending on what suits you.

We also support people with intellectual or learning disabilities, and we can work with you and your carers to help you feel safer.

How we help you when there is a problem with domestic violence or sexual violence:

  • Planning for safety
  • Going to court
  • Talking to Police
  • Meeting with lawyers
  • Linking with safe housing
  • Talking though what is happening to you, and helping you feel better and have more say over your life.

How to contact us:

Please contact us and we will put you in touch with someone to speak with about what is happening for you.

You might also find the link below from our sister organisation WWILD, who have resources that cover Domestic, Family, and Sexual Violence: https://wwild.org.au/easy-read-resources/

BACK TO TOP


 

Pets

Pets are part of the family.  They play an important part of the recovery process.

Pets can also be at risk due to domestic and family violence. Research indicates that approximately 50% of women in violent relationships report that their violent partner had also hurt or killed one of their pets.

We understand that the welfare of a family pet can play a key factor in a woman’s decision to leave a violent relationship. 33% of women who owned a pet delayed leaving a violent relationship because they fear the animal who has provided love and support when they need it most will be harmed.

It is not always possible for women to take their animal with them when fleeing an abusive home, especially during a crisis.

You might talk to services such as Pets In Crisis, which you can access through DVConnect Womensline on 1800 811 811

Download the Safety Planning for Pets Factsheet (PDF 706kb)

BACK TO TOP

In an emergency call the Police on 000

Are you worried someone will find out you visited this website?

Our website has a quick exit button near the bottom right-hand corner of the page. This button will close the DVAC website and open ABC News and the Google homepage. The button may be helpful if you are worried that you are being monitored and you are concerned that someone is about to see you looking at the DVAC site.

You may also want to delete your browser history. This means that the history of the websites you have visited will not be able to be seen. For information on deleting your internet history click here.

If someone is monitoring your online activity using spyware or monitoring devices, they may still be able to see that you have visited this website.

To discuss your online safety, speak with your DVAC support worker or call DVConnect 1800 811 811 (24-hour telephone advice line) or 1800 RESPECT (1800 737 732) (24-hour telephone counselling line).

For more information on your digital safety see:

Skip to content